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The global gender gap report 2014

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The report examines four critical areas of inequality between men and women in 130 economies around the globe, over 93% of the world’s population:
  • Economic participation and opportunity – outcomes on salaries, participation levels and access to high-skilled employment
  • Educational attainment – outcomes on access to basic and higher level education
  • Political empowerment – outcomes on representation in decision-making structures
  • Health and survival – outcomes on life expectancy and sex ratio. In this case parity is not assumed, there are assumed to be less female births than male (944 female for every 1,000 males), and men are assumed to die younger. Provided that women live at least six percent longer than men parity is assumed, if it is less than six percent it counts as a gender gap.

Top 25
Iceland 0.8594
Finland 0.8453
Norway 0.8374
4 Sweden 0.8165
Denmark 0.8025
Nicaragua 0.7894
Rwanda* 0.7854
Ireland 0.7850
Philippines 0.7814
10 Belgium 0.7809
11 Switzerland 0.7798
12 Germany 0.7780
13 New Zealand 0.7772
14 Netherlands 0.7730
15 Latvia 0.7691
16 France 0.7588
17 Burundi 0.7565
18 South Africa 0.7527
19 Canada 0.7464
20 United States 0.7463
21 Ecuador 0.7455
22 Bulgaria 0.7444
23 Slovenia 0.7443
24 Australia 0.7409
25 Moldova 0.7405


Sist på listan:
130 Saudi Arabia 0.6059
131 Mauritania 0.6029
132 Guinea* 0.6005
133 Morocco 0.5988
134 J ordan 0.5968
135 Lebanon 0.5923
136 Côte d’Ivoire 0.5874
137 Iran, Islamic Rep. 0.5811
138 Mali 0.5779
139 Syria 0.5775
140 Chad 0.5764
141 Pakistan 0.5522
142 Yemen

A surprising finding is that the U.S. ranks lower than some countries with considerably less economic development. Rwanda and Nicaragua both have less than $9 billion in GDP, but both rank among the top 10 countries in the world when it comes to gender equality. The index measures gender disparities in access to resources and opportunities, regardless of overall resource availability and level of economic development.

“Both rich countries and poor countries can afford gender equality,” World Economic Forum Senior Director Saadia Zahidi said in an interview with Fortune. “Gender equality doesn’t have to only come along once a country is fully developed.”

Värt att notera att sverige låg 1:a 2006 och 2007, men tappade sedan positionen och ligger nu på fjärde plats.

Länken till hela listan:
http://reports.weforum.org/global-gender-gap-report-2014/rankings/


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